Why Trump's tweets favor Russia over China

He has showered praise on Russian President Vladimir Putin, calling him "very smart!," and dismissed charges that Moscow tried to hack the election process -- even as he's bashed China for currency manipulation, skewing trade and failing to rein in North Korea.

It's unusual enough for a president-elect to try to sway foreign policy before he's in office, let alone in 140-character bursts. While Trump aides have said some of his statements shouldn't be taken "literally," the tweets offer insight to his foreign policy views and raise a question: When both China and Russia are challenging US power globally, why does he favor Moscow and not Beijing? Trump's positions on Russia and China mark a sharp turn from current policies -- and that might to the point. Trump and much of the Republican establishment have made clear they aim to dismantle parts of President Barack Obama's legacy. Trump is also looking to use international relations in pursuit of economic ends, even as some observers worry his approach is based on misperceptions of economic forces.

Some analysts point to the possibility that Trump is taking a deeply strategic approach; others say he simply fails to understand the crucial importance of long-standing US alliances. At the least, it is an approach that contrasts with Obama, who has tried to find areas of common interest with China to bridge serious divides. At the same time, he has endeavored, with little success, to isolate Russia for a series of international violations.

"It's a sign of confusion if you're making trouble with the Chinese at the same time as you're making trouble with US allies in Asia, and it's a sign of confusion if you're trying to make up with Russia at the same that you're not tending to American alliances in Europe," said Steven Sestanovich, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Matt Rojansky, head of the Kennan Institute at the Wilson Center, said one reason could be Trump's belief that the US should do more work with Russia to defeat terrorism and his view of that challenge as a "civilizational battle between radical Islam and, broadly speaking, the forces of Western civilization."


Trump and his aides, particularly his future national security adviser, retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, are much more comfortable including Russia under the "Western civilization" umbrella than prominent Republicans such as Arizona Sen. John McCain and South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, Rojansky said. That will cause friction, possibly sooner rather than later.

If Trump's stance on Russia might fray some of his alliances in Congress, he's already put European allies on edge with his warmth toward Putin and questions about the worth of NATO. He's also unnerved Asian allies by questioning the cost of helping Japan and South Korea defend themselves.

"The biggest lever we have with the Chinese is our network of alliances, similarly with the Russians,’' said Sestanovich, who is also a professor at Columbia University.

Some analysts have suggested Trump is practicing a sophisticated version of the "triangular diplomacy" former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and President Richard Nixon used to play the Soviet Union and China off against each other in the 1970s.But the two nations are no longer bitter enemies and instead have a well-defined, if mutually wary, relationship.

China, like Russia, has targeted the US with cyberattacks. Beijing has pushed US companies in China to give up proprietary technology, it has contested US claims to freedom of navigation through Asian waters, its military has buzzed US naval vessels and Air Force jets, and it recently stole a US underwater drone.

The President-elect, who manufactures parts of his clothing line in China, often charges that Beijing steals American jobs with unfair trade practices. "China has been taking out massive amounts of money & wealth from the U.S. in totally one-sided trade, but won't help with North Korea. Nice!" he tweeted Monday. Soon after winning the presidency, he antagonized Beijing by holding a phone conversation with Taiwan's leader.

Trump has long made China a bogeyman, accusing it in a 2012 tweet of having "created" the concept of global warming in order to make US manufacturing non-competitive. He has particularly fixated on China's economic practices, blasting it on trade and currency throughout the presidential race and blaming it for the loss of American jobs. Trade and job losses were central rallying cries of his campaign.

Richard Bush, director of the Center for East Asia Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution, said Trump's criticisms reflect a lack of understanding about international economics. "The jobs China is accused of stealing, many were lost a long time ago to Korea or Japan and moved from there to China," he said. "A lot of that job loss occurred because of technology change," he said. And despite Trump's promises to bring jobs back to the US, Bush said, "Nobody in the US would do them at the wages companies would want to charge. Those jobs are never going to be gotten back.» Bush also pointed out that there are limits to how much any US president can change relations with China. "Will the American business community sit idly by and watch Trump undertake a trade war with China? They have a lot at stake in this," he said. In the meantime, Trump's stream of anti-Chinese Tweets poses risks, he said. While Trump might be trying to create bargaining positions or exert pressure, his tweets might be misunderstood, Bush said, creating the chance that "China would regard a potential challenge as more dangerous than it actually might be."
 

3105 views


More Russian news

Alexander Rahr: ‘’While the West is struggling to create a monopolar world, there will be no fight against terror

Alexander Rahr: ‘’While the West is struggling to create a monopolar world, there will be no fight against terror"

The German political scientist on the possibilities of cooperation between Russia and the West in the sphere of ensuring the global security

Whether it is possible to create united center to combat international terrorism

Whether it is possible to create united center to combat international terrorism

Видео

Today, the 6th Moscow Conference on International Security MCIS-2017 continues its work

Maria Zakharova to Vestnik Kavkaza: Russia#039s objective is to contribute to Karabakh settlement

Maria Zakharova to Vestnik Kavkaza: Russia's objective is to contribute to Karabakh settlement

The official representative of the Russian Foreign Ministry Maria Zakharova told a briefing about the meeting of the Azerbaijani, Russian and Armenian foreign ministers, which will be held in Moscow on April 28. …

Russian ship sinks after collision near Turkey#039s Bosphorus

Russian ship sinks after collision near Turkey's Bosphorus

The Russian Black Sea Fleet's research vessel Liman sank in the sea after it collided with another ship, with the vessel’s entire crew rescued, Russia’s Defense Ministry said. "The ship Liman sank from holes below …

Moscow and Tbilisi looking for common ground

Moscow and Tbilisi looking for common ground

Видео

Russia and Georgia in a new international context

Naryshkin: no one immune from terrorist attacks

Naryshkin: no one immune from terrorist attacks

No single country, no single region can be a safe haven, no one is immune from terrorist attacks, Russia’s Foreign Intelligence Service chief Sergey Naryshkin said at the 6th Moscow Conference on International …

Ukraine building up military presence near Crimea

Ukraine building up military presence near Crimea

Ukraine is increasing the military presence of government forces near its borders with Russia's Republic of Crimea, the head of Crimea’s government committee for inter-ethnic relations, Zaur Smirnov said. …

Zakharova: US strikes on Syria make no sense and violate international law

Zakharova: US strikes on Syria make no sense and violate international law

US strikes on the Syrian air base violated international law and made neither military nor political sense, Russian Foreign Ministry spokesperson Maria Zakharova said. "That was something really unacceptable …

#039People#039s#039 bonds becoming popular

'People's' bonds becoming popular

For the first day, the Russians bought government federal bonds for individuals - 'people's bonds' - in the amount of 696.8 million rubles, the Russian Ministry of Finance said. "The placed volume is 696,807 million …

Video refereeing to be used at 2018 World Cup in Russia

Video refereeing to be used at 2018 World Cup in Russia

FIFA President Gianni Infantino said that video refereeing will be used at next year's World Cup in Russia. "We will use video refereeing because we've had nothing but positive feedback so far," …

more Russian news