Could a Euromaidan happen on Yerevan's Republic Square?

After the events of the last decade in Georgia, Kyrgyzstan and Ukraine, experts have started serious talks about colour revolutions in the South Caucasus. Some analysts say that the West is mobilizing opposition media, NGOs and politicians to open a new anti-Russian front in the Transcaucasus.

The term “democracy” in Armenia has long been exploited for information wars. For quite a while, Washington has been hesitating whether to support President Serzh Sargsyan or put bets on the opposition. After the victory of Sargsyan in early presidential polls, it seemed that the power was in the hands of a politician loyal to Moscow. However, it is hard to say that Armenia has a pure pro-Russian position. Sargsyan himself is trying to gain the support of both Russia and the U.S.

Three years ago, on September 3, it seemed that Yerevan had taken a pro-Russian path, that the mood in the republic was not that clear. U.S.-financed structures promoting democratic values are collecting political information and training civil activists too intensively.

According to the Center for World Journalism and Research, the work of non-governmental organizations in Armenia has reached a grand scale in recent years. The Justice Ministry has registered thousands of NGOs.

After the collapse of the USSR, the Armenian Assembly of America, a structure related to the State Department and the Armenian lobby in the Congress, has been in the avant-garde of American influence in Armenia. Leader of the Assembly Raffi Hovannisian studied and worked in the U.S. In 1991, Hovannisian became the first foreign minister of independent Armenia. By the way, Westerners integrated into the Armenian political elite pretty fast: State Department apologist Zhirayr Liparytyan became the president’s chief advisor, Sepukh Tashchyan, the supervisor of economic reforms, became the energy minister, Vagram Nersisyants, the executive director of the All-Armenian Bank, became the World Bank representative in Armenia.

Offices of the U.S., UK, France, Germany, Poland and Switzerland finance several humanitarian projects in Armenia today. Their goals are to protect human rights, develop mass media, organize conferences and round-table conferences, student and scientific exchanges, share specialists’ experience.

Armenia gets assistance from: USAID, the Eurasia Partnership Foundation, the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), London-based British Council and the Department for International Development (DFID), Germany’s GTZ, International IDEA, the International Organization for Migration (IOM), World Vision Armenia, NDI, IREX, the Environmental Public Advocacy Center (EPAC), the Open Society Institute (OSI).

NGOs are closely connected to the government, offering grants for some structures. Distribution of governmental grants is under the control of a monitoring group which includes functionaries of the presidential administration and officials of partner organizations. In 2010-2012, 31 organizations got governmental grants worth $1.2 million.

NGOs are involved in foreign political processes. USAID finances the Support Armenia – Turkey Rapprochement project. USAID initiated grants worth a million dollars for Armenian organizations, individuals, and companies within the framework of programs for normalization of Armenian-Turkish relations. The Eurasia Partnership Foundation, Yerevan Press Club, International Center for Human Development, Union of Manufacturers and Businessmen of Armenia are involved from the Armenian side.

The Eurasia Partnership Foundation (a branch of the Eurasia Fund of the U.S.) is active in projects related to mobilization of political activity, formation of alternative media and protection of religious minorities. By 2008, Eurasia spent over $15 million on grant programs in Armenia.

The National Endowment for Democracy (NED) assists such organizations as the Helsinki Association, the Helsinki Committee of Armenia, the Caucasus Center for Peacekeeping Initiatives, the Vanadzor Bureau of the Helsinki Civil Assembly, the Committee for Protection of Freedom of Speech, investigative journalists.

The Helsinki Association received a grant worth $62,250 last year to organize monitoring and information support for protection of human rights. In 2010-2013, America allocated $205,350 to the organization.

The Helsinki Committee of Armenia is actively speaking out against Eurasian integration of Armenia. It received $46,474 in 2010 to consolidate civil society on the grounds of freedom and democracy in rural areas of Armenia and Nagorno-Karabakh.

The Caucasus Center for Peacekeeping Initiatives was receiving NED support for promotion of cooperation and mutual understanding in civil society in the Caucasus in 2010-2013.

The Vanadzor Bureau of the Helsinki Civil Assembly considers Moscow’s membership in Eurasian projects unconstitutional. It received $131,650 from the NED. The Bureau is also supported by Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, the Civil Society Institute, Transparency International.

The Vanadzor Legal Clinic project got $9,985 from the American Bar Association. The project to strengthen human rights in the Armed Forces of Armenia got $20,280 from the U.S. embassy in Armenia. The project of institutional development of the Vanadzor Bureau got $161,520 from the Open Society Institute. The latter is a Soros Fund founded in Armenia in 1997. It has already spent over $24 million in Armenia.

The Committee for Protection of Freedom of Speech received $32,150 from the NED last year for monitoring state information sources. The Committee needs to check websites of 52 state organs and regional administrations. In 2010, the organization got $32,320.

The Investigative Journalists got $187,400, the Asparez Journalist Club got $58,650, the Independent Network of Journalists got $83,200 for creating a negative image of Russian-Armenian cooperation.

Experts are confident that such financing and training to use political technologies of this part of NGOs will give them a great advantage among other public forces..

Many organizations have actively been operating in Ukraine. Non-governmental and independent, they are connected to governmental structures, special services or centers of foreign policy-formation. The dependence of the human rights movements on their Western funds and institutions has put them under control of donors’ political goals.

Materials of the Center for World Journalism and Research were used for the article.

The apotheosis is already heard in Ukraine, Armenia is only having a preludeAfter the events of the last decade in Georgia, Kyrgyzstan and Ukraine, experts have started serious talks about colour revolutions in the South Caucasus. Some analysts say that the West is mobilizing opposition media, NGOs and politicians to open a new anti-Russian front in the Transcaucasus.The term “democracy” in Armenia has long been exploited for information wars. For quite a while, Washington has been hesitating whether to support President Serzh Sargsyan or put bets on the opposition. After the victory of Sargsyan in early presidential polls, it seemed that the power was in the hands of a politician loyal to Moscow. However, it is hard to say that Armenia has a pure pro-Russian position. Sargsyan himself is trying to gain the support of both Russia and the U.S.Three years ago, on September 3, it seemed that Yerevan had taken a pro-Russian path, that the mood in the republic was not that clear. U.S.-financed structures promoting democratic values are collecting political information and training civil activists too intensively.According to the Center for World Journalism and Research, the work of non-governmental organizations in Armenia has reached a grand scale in recent years. The Justice Ministry has registered thousands of NGOs.After the collapse of the USSR, the Armenian Assembly of America, a structure related to the State Department and the Armenian lobby in the Congress, has been in the avant-garde of American influence in Armenia. Leader of the Assembly Raffi Hovannisian studied and worked in the U.S. In 1991, Hovannisian became the first foreign minister of independent Armenia. By the way, Westerners integrated into the Armenian political elite pretty fast: State Department apologist Zhirayr Liparytyan became the president’s chief advisor, Sepukh Tashchyan, the supervisor of economic reforms, became the energy minister, Vagram Nersisyants, the executive director of the All-Armenian Bank, became the World Bank representative in Armenia.Offices of the U.S., UK, France, Germany, Poland and Switzerland finance several humanitarian projects in Armenia today. Their goals are to protect human rights, develop mass media, organize conferences and round-table conferences, student and scientific exchanges, share specialists’ experience.Armenia gets assistance from: USAID, the Eurasia Partnership Foundation, the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), London-based British Council and the Department for International Development (DFID), Germany’s GTZ, International IDEA, the International Organization for Migration (IOM), World Vision Armenia, NDI, IREX, the Environmental Public Advocacy Center (EPAC), the Open Society Institute (OSI).NGOs are closely connected to the government, offering grants for some structures. Distribution of governmental grants is under the control of a monitoring group which includes functionaries of the presidential administration and officials of partner organizations. In 2010-2012, 31 organizations got governmental grants worth $1.2 million.NGOs are involved in foreign political processes. USAID finances the Support Armenia – Turkey Rapprochement project. USAID initiated grants worth a million dollars for Armenian organizations, individuals, and companies within the framework of programs for normalization of Armenian-Turkish relations. The Eurasia Partnership Foundation, Yerevan Press Club, International Center for Human Development, Union of Manufacturers and Businessmen of Armenia are involved from the Armenian side.The Eurasia Partnership Foundation (a branch of the Eurasia Fund of the U.S.) is active in projects related to mobilization of political activity, formation of alternative media and protection of religious minorities. By 2008, Eurasia spent over $15 million on grant programs in Armenia.The National Endowment for Democracy (NED) assists such organizations as the Helsinki Association, the Helsinki Committee of Armenia, the Caucasus Center for Peacekeeping Initiatives, the Vanadzor Bureau of the Helsinki Civil Assembly, the Committee for Protection of Freedom of Speech, investigative journalists.The Helsinki Association received a grant worth $62,250 last year to organize monitoring and information support for protection of human rights. In 2010-2013, America allocated $205,350 to the organization.The Helsinki Committee of Armenia is actively speaking out against Eurasian integration of Armenia. It received $46,474 in 2010 to consolidate civil society on the grounds of freedom and democracy in rural areas of Armenia and Nagorno-Karabakh.The Caucasus Center for Peacekeeping Initiatives was receiving NED support for promotion of cooperation and mutual understanding in civil society in the Caucasus in 2010-2013.The Vanadzor Bureau of the Helsinki Civil Assembly considers Moscow’s membership in Eurasian projects unconstitutional. It received $131,650 from the NED. The Bureau is also supported by Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, the Civil Society Institute, Transparency International.The Vanadzor Legal Clinic project got $9,985 from the American Bar Association. The project to strengthen human rights in the Armed Forces of Armenia got $20,280 from the U.S. embassy in Armenia. The project of institutional development of the Vanadzor Bureau got $161,520 from the Open Society Institute. The latter is a Soros Fund founded in Armenia in 1997. It has already spent over $24 million in Armenia.The Committee for Protection of Freedom of Speech received $32,150 from the NED last year for monitoring state information sources. The Committee needs to check websites of 52 state organs and regional administrations. In 2010, the organization got $32,320.The Investigative Journalists got $187,400, the Asparez Journalist Club got $58,650, the Independent Network of Journalists got $83,200 for creating a negative image of Russian-Armenian cooperation.Experts are confident that such financing and training to use political technologies of this part of NGOs will give them a great advantage among other public forces..Many organizations have actively been operating in Ukraine. Non-governmental and independent, they are connected to governmental structures, special services or centers of foreign policy-formation. The dependence of the human rights movements on their Western funds and institutions has put them under control of donors’ political goals.Materials of the Center for World Journalism and Research were used for the artic

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