White Cranes of Rasul Gamzatov

White Cranes of Rasul Gamzatov

 

White Cranes of Rasul GamzatovSymbols of common memory and common history<--break->By Vestnik KavkazaThe Moscow House of Nationalities hosted the White Cranes evening dedicated to the art of Rasul Gamzatov. A film about the life and art of the poet, with songs and ballads based on the poetry of Rasul Gamzatov was demonstrated at the meeting.Besides literature and musical moments inspired by the works of Rasul Gamzatov, guests enjoyed the bright dances of the legendary ensemble Lezginka.The annual Day of the White Cranes was started by Dagestani People’s Poet Rasul Gamzatov to commemorate warriors killed in the Great Patriotic War and other wars and conflicts. According to Caucasian beliefs, the souls of dead warriors live in the beautiful white birds, cranes.It seems to me sometimes that soldiers fallen,Whom bloody battlefields have rendered dead,Were buried not in soil to be forgotten,But turned into white cranes in flight instead.(from “The Cranes” by Rasul Gamzatov, translated into English by David M. Bennett)Gamzatov wrote the poem in 1965. It was translated into Russian by Naum Grebnyov and combined with composer Yan Frenkel’s music. After the first performance of “The Cranes” by Mark Burns, the song spread throughout the planet. It became a requiem song, a prayer song, a lament for all the soldiers “whom bloody battlefields have rendered dead.”Soon afterwards, Rasul Gamzatov proposed marking October 22 as the Day of the White Cranes. The holiday became all-Russian recently, it had previously only been marked in Dagestan. The holiday is celebrated in Gunib, where many Dagestanis and other ethnicities gather to commemorate warriors. In time, the Day of the White Cranes became a symbol of peace in the Caucasus, a symbol of the common fate of the Russian people and the peoples of the Caucasus, pacifism and respect for history.Cranes have no nationality, they symbolize the memory of all the people killed in battles. No wonder there have been 20 monuments to white cranes built in different parts of the Soviet Union, people of the post-Soviet space have a common memory and a common history.

 

 

 

Symbols of common memory and common history
By Vestnik Kavkaza
The Moscow House of Nationalities hosted the White Cranes evening dedicated to the art of Rasul Gamzatov. A film about the life and art of the poet, with songs and ballads based on the poetry of Rasul Gamzatov was demonstrated at the meeting.
Besides literature and musical moments inspired by the works of Rasul Gamzatov, guests enjoyed the bright dances of the legendary ensemble Lezginka.
The annual Day of the White Cranes was started by Dagestani People’s Poet Rasul Gamzatov to commemorate warriors killed in the Great Patriotic War and other wars and conflicts. According to Caucasian beliefs, the souls of dead warriors live in the beautiful white birds, cranes.
It seems to me sometimes that soldiers fallen,Whom bloody battlefields have rendered dead,Were buried not in soil to be forgotten,But turned into white cranes in flight instead.(from “The Cranes” by Rasul Gamzatov, translated into English by David M. Bennett)
Gamzatov wrote the poem in 1965. It was translated into Russian by Naum Grebnyov and combined with composer Yan Frenkel’s music. After the first performance of “The Cranes” by Mark Burns, the song spread throughout the planet. It became a requiem song, a prayer song, a lament for all the soldiers “whom bloody battlefields have rendered dead.”
Soon afterwards, Rasul Gamzatov proposed marking October 22 as the Day of the White Cranes. The holiday became all-Russian recently, it had previously only been marked in Dagestan. The holiday is celebrated in Gunib, where many Dagestanis and other ethnicities gather to commemorate warriors. In time, the Day of the White Cranes became a symbol of peace in the Caucasus, a symbol of the common fate of the Russian people and the peoples of the Caucasus, pacifism and respect for history.
Cranes have no nationality, they symbolize the memory of all the people killed in battles. No wonder there have been 20 monuments to white cranes built in different parts of the Soviet Union, people of the post-Soviet space have a common memory and a common history.

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