Armenian “lavash” and “duduk”

The Caucasian History Center has presented a technology called the Lie Detector on its updated website (www.caucasianhistory.info).  The ethnolinguistic “polygraph” has tested the words “lavash” and “duduk” to see whether they belong to the Armenian culture and heritage. Armenia filed a bid to add lavash to the Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage as traditional Armenian bread at the 9th session of the Intergovernmental Committee of the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage Convention in Paris on November 26, 2014. Armenia’s initiative caused a negative reaction in Azerbaijan, Turkey and Iran. Thus, UNESCO changed the formulation of lavash as  traditional bread reflecting Armenian culture. 

The UNESCO commission confirmed that lavash was not a purely Armenian invention. The Caucasian History Center has developed a scientific method named the ethnolinguistic Lie Detector to prevent Armenian speculations around lavash and other heritage. The technology provides indisputable proof and ends Armenia’s unjustified claims to ownership of Azerbaijani and other examples of cultural heritage. The Lie Detector has used research and dictionaries of the 17th-20th centuries, including ones written by Armenian scientists. This makes it easy to check the appurtenance of rites, household items, music, songs, cultural and culinary traditions.

The ethnolinguistic Lie Detector, or the polygraph as some call it, processed the sources and materials with which Armenia backs its claims to lavash and duduk. About 20 dictionaries written by European, Russian and Armenian researchers of the 17th-20th centuries and Medieval Turkic dictionaries of different historical periods were checked. 

It was later discovered that old Armenian and Classical Armenian language dictionaries published in Europe and Russia throughout the ages do not contain the words “lavash” or “duduk”. The word “lavash” can only be found in the dictionary of Armenian linguist A.S. Dagbashyan, published in 1906. This reiterates again that Armenians took lavash and other elements of cultural and spiritual heritage from Turkic nations. Turkic languages and dialects from Turkestan, the Caucasus and the Volga Region to the Balkans have been familiar with the word “lavash” since ancient times. The Orkhon runic Turkic script in the epitaph of Tonyukuk (died in 724 AD) have the words “yuyga” and “yuha” (flour lavash). Mahmoud al-Kashgari’s dictionary (11th century) contains the words “yuvka” (flour lavash). 

Even Armenian author Sevan Nisanyan’s dictionary fixes the word “Lavash” in Turkic texts of the 13th century. The word is omitted in the Armenian language dictionaries of the early 20th century, even the Armenian dictionaries of 1749-1836. 

It has been univocally fixed that the word “lavash” in Turkic languages has a wide interpretation and can refer to food and any rolled layered objects. Similar results have been achieved after investigations of the musical instrument “duduk”. “Duduk” can be seen in European, Russian and Armenian dictionaries as a Turkic word with quite a broad sense, not only as a musical instrument. The word is traced in Turkic sources starting with the 7th century and has been adopted by Armenia recently. 

So, none of the 18 Armenian dictionaries published in 1698-1908 mention the word “lavash”, with the only exception of a dictionary published in 1906, neither is the word “duduk”. 

It was also revealed that the Armenian language has thousands of words borrowed from Persian, Arabic, Turkic and other languages. The Azerbaijani literary language Türkçe does not have a single borrowing from the Armenian language. 

The method easily proves the lack of reasons for Armenia to claim the origin of lavash, duduk and other cultural values of Turkic and other peoples as its own. The technology will be a good argument for scientists and media to see how fair Armenian claims for cultural heritage are. Scientific research and conclusions made by the Caucasian History Center will be translated into English and other languages, sent to international organizations, primarily to UNESCO, where experts put specialist list items like Armenian cultural heritage without even deigning to check.

The Caucasian History Center has presented a technology called the Lie Detector on its updated website (www.caucasianhistory.info). The ethnolinguistic “polygraph” has tested the words “lavash” and “duduk” to see whether they belong to the Armenian culture and heritage. Armenia filed a bid to add lavash to the Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage as traditional Armenian bread at the 9th session of the Intergovernmental Committee of the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage Convention in Paris on November 26, 2014. Armenia’s initiative caused a negative reaction in Azerbaijan, Turkey and Iran. Thus, UNESCO changed the formulation of lavash as  traditional bread reflecting Armenian culture. The UNESCO commission confirmed that lavash was not a purely Armenian invention. The Caucasian History Center has developed a scientific method named the ethnolinguistic Lie Detector to prevent Armenian speculations around lavash and other heritage. The technology provides indisputable proof and ends Armenia’s unjustified claims to ownership of Azerbaijani and other examples of cultural heritage. The Lie Detector has used research and dictionaries of the 17th-20th centuries, including ones written by Armenian scientists. This makes it easy to check the appurtenance of rites, household items, music, songs, cultural and culinary traditions.The ethnolinguistic Lie Detector, or the polygraph as some call it, processed the sources and materials with which Armenia backs its claims to lavash and duduk. About 20 dictionaries written by European, Russian and Armenian researchers of the 17th-20th centuries and Medieval Turkic dictionaries of different historical periods were checked. It was later discovered that old Armenian and Classical Armenian language dictionaries published in Europe and Russia throughout the ages do not contain the words “lavash” or “duduk”. The word “lavash” can only be found in the dictionary of Armenian linguist A.S. Dagbashyan, published in 1906. This reiterates again that Armenians took lavash and other elements of cultural and spiritual heritage from Turkic nations. Turkic languages and dialects from Turkestan, the Caucasus and the Volga Region to the Balkans have been familiar with the word “lavash” since ancient times. The Orkhon runic Turkic script in the epitaph of Tonyukuk (died in 724 AD) have the words “yuyga” and “yuha” (flour lavash). Mahmoud al-Kashgari’s dictionary (11th century) contains the words “yuvka” (flour lavash). Even Armenian author Sevan Nisanyan’s dictionary fixes the word “Lavash” in Turkic texts of the 13th century. The word is omitted in the Armenian language dictionaries of the early 20th century, even the Armenian dictionaries of 1749-1836. It has been univocally fixed that the word “lavash” in Turkic languages has a wide interpretation and can refer to food and any rolled layered objects. Similar results have been achieved after investigations of the musical instrument “duduk”. “Duduk” can be seen in European, Russian and Armenian dictionaries as a Turkic word with quite a broad sense, not only as a musical instrument. The word is traced in Turkic sources starting with the 7th century and has been adopted by Armenia recently. So, none of the 18 Armenian dictionaries published in 1698-1908 mention the word “lavash”, with the only exception of a dictionary published in 1906, neither is the word “duduk”. It was also revealed that the Armenian language has thousands of words borrowed from Persian, Arabic, Turkic and other languages. The Azerbaijani literary language Türkçe does not have a single borrowing from the Armenian language. The method easily proves the lack of reasons for Armenia to claim the origin of lavash, duduk and other cultural values of Turkic and other peoples as its own. The technology will be a good argument for scientists and media to see how fair Armenian claims for cultural heritage are. Scientific research and conclusions made by the Caucasian History Center will be translated into English and other languages, sent to international organizations, primarily to UNESCO, where experts put specialist list items like Armenian cultural heritage without even deigning to ch

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